Reaping Kickstarter rewards

In 2014 crowd funding continued with some epically failing to reach the starting line, while others silently gained momentum smashing their targets. It was also the year that early access seemed to be everywhere, maybe a little too much in some case as the public want to make sure they are buying into the thing they have confidence in.

So in 2014 I backed a number of Kickstarters of those the following have been  Fate tokens by Campaign coins, Vye: The Card Game by Sand Hat Games and Elegy for a Dead World: A Game About Writing Fiction by Debojaan Games.

1) In December my Fate Coins arrived and I have to admit were rather awesome. The cost was more than I was originally going to back but I upped my amount and really like mixture of coins I received.
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I’m planning to put them to good use this year by running some Fate role playing games.

Elegy-2014-12-08-20-50-39-05-300x1872) I had a copy of Elegy for a Dead World delivered via Humble Bundle, and redeemable on Steam. I have a weak spot for Debojaan games but then I’m rarely disappointed. The game sees you visiting alien worlds and help you create a narrative about the people who inhabited these distant worlds.

Featuring writing prompts that aim to inspire you to detail a story the final days of a worlds population.You can share your stories with others and there is even a pay on print option with screenshots from the game.

vye queen3) Finally is Vye which was being run by some of the ex-City of Heroes staff. The game is very simple area of control game and quite fast paced, I’m rather keen to play it at home and at my work game evening.

Additionally the artwork on the cards is awesome and I have the print and play version available to test before the final version arrives sometime in June.

 

The Witches

I had Tree Frog Games’s The Witches for Christmas we have only played it once and so we decided to take it out for another spin tonight. This is the second game based in the Discworld universe but is quite different from Anhk Morpork.
The game is set in Lancre, players control one of 4 trainee witches who are honing their skills by solving problems of ranging difficulty.

Each turn the game players can move but if they get to problem tile they have to try and solve it.
Solving problems is dependant on the total of 4 dice rolls plus any additional modifiers that a player has available to them. To bring a little chance to the situation players roll 2 dice, has the opportunity to play cards to increase their total, then they roll the remaining 2 dice to complete their attempt at resolving a problem.

TheWitchesThe dice have no ONEs as they are replaced with Cackle markers which if you accumulate too many can lead to losing point at the end of game scoring section. Thankfully to reduce your cackles you can land on the same square as another witch which automatically means you have to have Tea, as it’s etiquette, this gives both player chance to reduce their negative cackle points.

The game progress with multiple factors that could lead to the end of the game and force scoring to occur.

The rules are complete and nicely ordered that means looking up things is rather easy, plus there is a crib sheet included in the box too. However the rule are detailed completely and we didn’t have any problem relearning again as it soon came back to us.

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#Blaugust #Discworld #TabletopGames

XCOM Board game

I have to admit that after seeing that a XCOM game was coming I was a little dubious as I didn’t know how it would transfer across mediums. I was even more concerned when I spotted that Fantasy Flight Games were releasing it.

It’s a cooperative game for 1 to 4 players, where as games like Forbidden Island and Castle Panic use a mechanic designed into the game to simulate opposition the XCOM board game uses a companion App to control it. This means that players need a PC, mobile phone or tablet in order to play.

box-XCOM-rightThe app brings timed deadlines into play with the players have to respond to the threat in real-time making decisions toughers and more fluid than usual in a co-op game. However the actual combat takes place without on the time limit.
The app also can be used to learn the game and teach the rules, which given how cumbersome FFG rules usual are, this can’t be a bad thing.

Destroy UFOs. Research alien technology. Defend your base. Uncover the alien invasion plan. Should you fail, humanity is doomed.

The players take on the roles of 4 department heads at XCOM, these are the Commander, Chief Scientist, Central Officer and Squad Leader, each with their own unique skills, no matter how many are playing these roles are always in play.

The game looks to use many of the features that the video game employed, so for example if a UFO is tracked but your interceptors fail to take it down, fear will spread in the continents. If it turns to panic then your funding will start to drop undermining and hindering your efforts, 2 continents go into panic and XCOM forces lose the game.

The game employs a push your luck dice mechanic that aims to get the players taking risks in order to succeed, the number of dice used is dependant on the task and modifiers you have.
Each dice only has 2 success indicators and you are unlikely to achieve success without a follow up roll, each roll carries a higher risk of failure.

From what I’ve seen the game looks rather nice, there have been some concerned raised about the longevity of a game needing an application in order to run, but I’d rather get the game and play it now than worry about the 5 years time what-ifs.

If you want to have a look at the game and app, Drive Thru Review posted these two videos from GenCon.

#XCOM #TableTopGames